Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Received at the Library

"Pre-vital records" is a new term to this writer, headlining the May-June 2017 issue of Your genealogy today.  The article points out the many possible sources for birth, death, marriage and divorce records beyond the obvious.  These records are the states' responsibility and many, especially in the South, did not get organized until the 20th century -- North Carolina is used as an example.   A thorough article on identifying waterways led me to the Geographic Names Information System, where I discovered that in addition to the one in Wellfleet that I live near, there are Blackfish Creeks in Tasmania, Ontario, and Kentucky (presumably the latter at least is not named for the small whales that occasionally come to Wellfleet).

Internet genealogy for Aug./Sept. 2017 leads off with an experienced genealogist's tips for taking advantage of free resources (think trial subscriptions or free but time-limited access to webinars at Legacy.com) and best research practices.  The Irish Newspaper Archive, a subscription database, is reviewed, as are a couple of tools for creating family histories.  Articles on state encyclopedias and on yearbooks expand on resources you might not have thought to explore.  A thorough review of online sources related to Freemasons explains the organization and history of this secretive but historically significant network.  As always, new databases and tools are briefly reviewed.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

September Meeting to Feature Presentations from Two CCGS Members

September 19 meeting will open the 2017 - 2018 monthly program sessions of the Cape Cod Genealogical Society.


Mark your calendar to join us for the first general meeting of the Cape Cod Genealogical Society (CCGS) of the 2017 - 2018 program year. Two of our own members, John Schoenfelder and David Martin, will be giving presentations on their genealogy research efforts.

John Schoenfelder's presentation on "You Can Publish Too" will summarize his journey, with all the steps, problems, and decisions to finally arrive in the publication of his great-grandfather's history. John will cover retrieval efforts, the organization and formatting, copy layout, and "on-demand" publishing that resulted in the book, "From His Toil and The Soil".

David Martin, in his presentation "Will the Real John C. Fowler Please Stand Up", will recount his efforts in getting around a brick wall with a confusing ancestor. As part of the presentation, David will share the methodologies learned from a highly challenging 30-year odyssey to find the parentage of a great-great-grandfather.

Both John and David are members of the Cape Cod Genealogical Society. John Schoenfelder, who's been conducting his genealogical research for a number of years, usually spends winters in Florida but is on Cape during the warmer months. David Martin is Professor/Dean Emeritus at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. He has been doing genealogy research for about 40 years; he is Past President of CCGS, Chair of the Society's Education Committee and Co-Chair of the Publications Committee, as well as leader of the CCGS Computer SIG.

The CCGS meeting will take place at the Brewster Ladies' Library, Rte. 6A, Brewster, on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 10 a.m. All are invited to come earlier for socializing and refreshments at 9:30 a.m.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Received at the Library

"Road trip for roadblocks" is the featured article in Your genealogy today for July/Aug. 2017.  The author suggests onsite visits to the local court house, registry office, cemetery, library and more to add depth to your knowledge of an ancestor.  An interesting account of an Irish immigrant who chose loyalty to the British crown and removed to Canada from South Carolina shows another side to the American revolution.  Other articles cover baby and funeral books, organizing DNA results, information found in lost & found ads, and tips for investigating black sheep in your family.  A poignant description of using information gleaned from genealogy research to stir memories in an Alzheimer's victim rounds out the issue.

Several articles in NGS magazine for April-June 2017 deal with World War I research.  Two of those articles deal with foreign populations: internment of enemy aliens, and treatment of "hyphenated Americans."  The latter is a new term to me, but references for example German-Americans, who were treated with hysteria on the homefront.  (My father was named Otto at birth in 1907, but it was dropped in favor of his middle name William due to anti-German sentiment during WWI.)  In addition, there is a cluster of religion-themed articles (using religious periodicals, Irish dissenting churches, and church-related organizations, like the Knights of Columbus).